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The Vorlon
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4,516 Posts
That is an example of how NOT to build a stiffening member. Ugh. #-o

Sorry, but from what I know about engineering it looks like a POS to me.
 

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Mufasa in Training
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32,644 Posts
I'm sure its an over engineered harness bar. Not for stiffening.
Wouldn't even recommend it for that. Without a rollbar, harnesses are just a bad idea, IMHO (not to mention illegal in SCCA Solo unless your car has a real framed roof). At least for the Hard Dog rollbars, this thing comes down right where the front uprights for the main hoop would go (and wouldn't really even stiffen the car as much as the rollbar).
 

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Senior Member
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2,708 Posts
That is an example of how NOT to build a stiffening member. Ugh. #-o

Sorry, but from what I know about engineering it looks like a POS to me.
He said "stiffening member" *Beavis chuckle* :mrgreen:

Seriously though, I'm willing to bet my "stiffening member" that if you do the "lift test" (jacking one corner of the car up and see how aligned or misaligned the car door is) you will see less deflection. In other words, over rail-roads tracks where the chassis is flexing in every direction, I think this bar will do It something. It does triangulate the vertical and horizontal planes, so I'm thiking it will do more then a strut tower bar.

I could be wrong though.
 

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Registered
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519 Posts
(Don't mean to threadjack)

But what's with all the bolt-in braces and rollbars i've been seeing? Isn't it significantly weaker than welds? I could see it as sufficient for strut pieces but not rollbars.

My buddy has a cusco rollbar in his S2000 and it looks like it'll fall apart if he flips his car. Won't the strength of the bolts play a big factor?

Sacrafice on labor for lower production cost and convenience ?

I'm not an expert.. someone fill me in.
 

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Senior Member
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2,708 Posts
^^Have you seen a bolted roll bar in action? I've seen a few 'verts at the tracks with the shiny side down. It works. It's not like when you roll over you are putting a tremendous force on the bars. The weight is distributed through four, sometimes 6 points throught the chassis. The bolts would be the lesser concern if you're talking about a really high-speed, multiple rollover situation, it's what the bolts are connected to (sheet-metal) Which is why some sanctioning bodies requires the mounting points to be welded AND boxed for all-out race cars. But for everyday driving and track-day driving, bolted bars are fine.
 

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Mufasa in Training
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32,644 Posts
^^Have you seen a bolted roll bar in action? I've seen a few 'verts at the tracks with the shiny side down. It works. It's not like when you roll over you are putting a tremendous force on the bars. The weight is distributed through four, sometimes 6 points throught the chassis. The bolts would be the lesser concern if you're talking about a really high-speed, multiple rollover situation, it's what the bolts are connected to (sheet-metal) Which is why some sanctioning bodies requires the mounting points to be welded AND boxed for all-out race cars. But for everyday driving and track-day driving, bolted bars are fine.
I think he means bars where the hoop is bolted to the supports (not welded, like Hard Dog, Autopower, etc. bars are). In that case, the hoop and support are only joined by one bolt.
 
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