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I've been reading up on UTI and am wondering if that's a good choice from all the mixed reviews. i took a few classes at my local community college [saddleback] which has a good auto program , but im not sure which is the best route.

As most kids i have not idea what i want to do besides stay in the auto industry, i figure
I want to get a well paying job at a dealership when I graduate, to get some real world experience under my belt, then eventually get into the performance aspect of the auto industry.

I would be going into this school with not alot of automotive experience. I havent had a car related job before, and I've only done the basic work on my own cars (changing oil, installing basic bolt on parts etc).

That being said, for those of you who have already made this choice, or are in the same situation as I am, what do you think would be the best choice?
 

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I went to UTI in 2004. Its pretty good if you want to work in a dealership. They give you a good basis of knowledge. You dont learn everything but you learn all the basics that will allow you to progress.
When I went though, most of the students that where there at the time had a high school mentality and it was very distracting. So if you actually pay attention and work hard you will be fine. Plus if your really serious about working in a dealership or something you should be studying and working on your own to get your ASE certifications and such.
 

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Well I went to a community college and took the two year accosiates degree program. Spent around maybe 3k for books and classes. Only about 1k on tools. It's not everything I am going to need but I can get a job at any dealership I want because most of the time they start you at an entry level position. Just doing oil changes and such.

Infact I'm being considered for a position with a company you all know. Can't say who just yet. But let's just say it's my dream job.

If I were you I would stick with the community college. If you apply yourself and keep asking more of your teachers the end result is the same. With less damage done to your pocket.
 

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This country needs engineers, if you're up to it that is.

Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk
 

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UTI is the biggest waste of money, you spend 20k plus for the exact same education I got at my local community college. That UTI education doesn't seem like its very good either, there have been many kids at my dealership fresh out of there that worked on the lube rack and none have lasted over 5 months. Speaking with them you can tell they are not very bright or know much.
 

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$20k+ is a lot to pay for less than a year of instruction from a school that isn't accredited.

Not to mention you'll have to shell out probably $10k for a toolbox at the end of that to go to work at a shop.
Actually UTI is accredited unlike wyotech.

I went there and it gave me a good understanding of how things work and gave me the confidence to do stuff I was already doing. I wanted to work at a dealer but my friend had a hard time being placed at a mercedes dealer after he graduated from the m-sat merc program so I was kind of discouraged but now want to go back to complete the smog program and get certified for the state of cali and hopefully open up a my own smog shop.

You can go the route of community college but it usually takes double the time to go through all the classes at UTI. You can double phase which means take two classes daily and complete the core program in 6 months if your up for it.
 

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I think we at the same boat. I'm at the community college for the auto class. Try to get the AS degree in 2 years.
I need to get the SMOG lincense first and try to get as much ASE certificates as I can.
The good side of working on dealership is you get Health insurance and special tool/equipment ready, but kinda only work on same car/makes.
For the individual shop you work different cars and may get good money if you got good knowledges of cars.
The most awesome job I think is to work for govement vehicle department like cop cars or government cars. I heard that they pay 2hrs to do a oil change.lol
I have financial aid and basically don't pay anything. Just buy tools.
I don't know about UTI. Seems they aren't cheap.

For the entry level u got pay around 20k
If u keep updated and working hard it may max out to 60k-80k if u are master tech.
To me it is not making hell lot of money if u are not open ur own business but we like working on cars and get paid, happy work right?
 

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Dude if your going to pay 20k or more for schooling come to UNM and take the mechanical engineering class. You get to build race cars and design all of the components.
 

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Here is my take on UTI. I'm a graduate from UTI and they really do give you a good education and I learned so much. But you have to be willing to learn and dedicate yourself to going to school every single day. Dealerships are looking for smart techs but also looking for people who look and act professional. That means showing up every day on time and in proper uniform. What UTI teaches that a lot of others school don't is professionalism. You have to be willing to show up everyday to class and in proper uniform. Professionalism was just as important of a grade as tests, and lab work.

I also went to school with a lot of students who didn't know much about cars that ended up getting decent jobs after graduation. Biggest thing they don't tell you is you have to be willing to move to get a job. They say there are jobs out there but don't tell you that most likely you will have to love to get one. If I were you and went to UTI I would work my ass and try and get into an msat which is where after you graduate a company like BMW or Volvo pays for your education so you can learn their dealer specific training.
 

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One of my brothers when to UTI. He actually did well & is kinda well off working for Mercedes Benz. He's one of the lucky few that actually got a job, though. Most of his other classmates didn't even get a chance to work at a lube shop, a.k.a. unemployed or doing something else not related to their schooling.





This country needs engineers, if you're up to it that is.
This. :D

It might hurt your brain after a while & you might work long hours, but if you eventually get to work at a proving ground for a manufacturer or work with a racing team, you be glad that you went to school for 5 years to become an M.E. & that you worked your ass off for a long while to get to where you're at.
 

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If I were you Gabe, I would not study to become a technician/mechanic. Take a look at the possibilities that open up if you study engineering with a concentration on the automotive field. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automotive_engineering

You can go to community college and study to transfer for mechanical engineering or automotive engineering and work in the automotive industry not as a technician but as a contributing member to the design of new vehicles. I bet you can go to school for free next semester. :whistle:
 

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^^^ +1
 

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I'm at Kettering University in Flint, MI. Obviously it's a long way from you, and it's in the asshole of Michigan, but I though I'd share about the school. While it's not strictly automotive, it is strictly Engineering and is majorly focused on automotive. Our program is a little odd, every student must have a co-op, from the time they start at Kettering. We go 3 months at school, then 3 months at work, and rotate for 4 and a half years (I don't get more than 4 or 5 weeks off during the year). I'm just a little Freshman, but I've already scored a job at Bilstein, making great money, and my company has already offered me a full time job after my 4 years here.
 

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Well, it's a little different, but take a look at McPherson College (where I'm at right now). They've become known for their Auto Restoration program which is a four year program and is a Bachelor of Science degree. It incorporates aspects of tech and also gen ed. courses being a liberal arts school, but lots of people have gotten jobs at restoration places around the country, there are all sorts of internships including some with Mercedes-Benz.

One key thing to keep in mind is that the major focuses around classic cars and full on restoration, so there isn't a lot in the sort of computer diagnostics and such on modern cars. I'm going here for the Auto Communication side of things so I have/will be taking journalism classes in addition to basic restoration classes.

And I had as little if not less car experience than you doing stuff like oil changes and bolt ons. To get in you just put together a portfolio of whatever you've done and of stuff that shows you really care about cars. They've also got a one week program you can do in the summer to get a taste of it and that helps with getting in.

Also of note, yes it's in the middle of Kansas so just keep that in mind. It could be worse it could be better ;). And imports aren't exactly well represented, but I'm here and I have a Miata too! lol But take a look and at least keep it in mind, it's kind of cool here :phillyb:

http://www.mcpherson.edu/academics/autorestoration.php


(off topic: the new emoticons here are pretty cool. I felt I needed to try the phillyb one lol)
 
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