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You've got to put in the hard work to get the reward, those are just stepping stones. Sounds to me like you're being lazy, why the **** would you skip classes that you're paying for?
Too true. I didn't read all the posts but I hope OP realizes this.

For those suggesting mechanical engineering, he wouldn't be able to finish it. I'd be surprised if he got through first year. Mechanical engineering is hard work, very hard work and it doesn't align with your goals. Just because you like cars doesn't mean you should go into mechanical engineering. In fact, it has next to nothing to contribute to your hobby of cars, unless you are the type to get real geeked out calculating some intense **** about your car, which you will barely realize in performance unless you are doing some SERIOUS competing.

I don't mean to come off as a prick, I am just trying to put it bluntly. I am a 4th year mechanical engineer at arguably the best engineering school in Canada. I tell you all this through personal experience. If you are interested in mechanical engineering still, or any program for that matter, go to the campus and ask around and try to find someone in the program and just shadow them for a day or so to find out what the program really is all about. The tours that the universities / colleges give are typically a bunch of BS and don't really give you any insight into the actual program.

A word of advice though, what heyitsryan said is too true. No pain no gain. Also, don't expect money to flock in if you don't make the right moves. It's not ENTIRELY about the diploma, its about who you know and you do with those connections.
 

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Concerning college: I suggest that you make no attempt whatsoever to go to an actual College or University until you know exactly what you're going to study. Otherwise, you will be wasting your (or someone else's) money.
I'm kinda against this point. IMO, no one knows exactly what they want to do. Not even after they graduate. I don't think many people decide their lifetime career before going to university, and then stick with it the rest of their lives. IMO, I'd say its more realistic to get a degree that will offer you job security and lots of options (tbh, mechanical engineering fits the bill here. Theres been no shortage of jobs and I can't count the number of times I hear my friends complaining about no jobs and pointing out the fact that there are so many engineering positions at job fairs). Then make some money. And while you're making money, put yourself out there and find out what you like. You'll have saved up some money, and will have enough to support whatever decisions you choose to make. You're not going to learn anything or get a better idea of what you want to do by staying at home and thinking about it. During this school, graduating, working process, you will change and you will be exposed to more things. From here you will get a better idea of what it is you exactly want to do and what you really are good at (that you might not have known before). Going through university and doing co-op work placements really change you. You learn a lot, both academically and personally.

Hope this helps. Best of luck.
 

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As for going through classes that you don't like, just look at them as discipline. I bet you could job shadow a doctor for 6 months and be able to perform the basic duties of his job. But it took him 10 years of school to get it. Sometimes it isn't what you're learning that will help you, it's showing that you're dedicated and willing to put up with BS to get where you want to be.
Also very true. +1
 

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Last piece of advice. If you are thinking engineering, the only option is co-op. I cannot stress enough how valuable work experience is when finding a job after graduating. I've had the opportunity to work at very big name companies for 20 months (4 months at a time). This paid off my tuition ($6000 for 4 months) and my rent and living costs. Expect to make anywhere from $16-$35 per hour as a co-op. To put this in perspective, I made $25,000 summer. Needless to say, I don't mind paying an extra $2000 in tuition over everyone else when I'm making this much. A couple of my friends made just over $30,000 in 4 months. The last thing you want is a mechanical engineering degree working at starbucks because you have no work experience.
 

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My 2 cents: being a mechainc IS manual labor, which you clearly states you dont want to do. Also, for something like that you are, in my opinion, better off working at any shop that will hire you for two years. You will learn more, and at the end of two years you will be even instead of having spent xx amount of your parents money.

Lastly, grow the **** up. Skipping classes will lead to skipping work which will get you fired. I am 23, went to tech school on my own dime at 18 and have lived on my own since 18. I have a car, I am married, I am in the process of buying a house, and when I get my house I will be starting my owm upholstery business. If you cant even make it to class without someone pushing you to go, dont expect to make it far in the real world.
:icon_cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Edough, I acknowledged that I'm lazy as **** and as I've said, that's what being in school and work is slowly changing. The problem is I already have no interest in this course. When I decided to take this course I thought I would have a bunch of math classes, etc. This was before I realized to become and engineer you need a university degree. I didn't realize this course was to prep people to become a Millwright or Machinist apprentice, which I have zero interest in either of them.

I also don't understand why people think that because I skip these useless classes that I'm not cut out for engineering. I hate the in-shop classes. I don't like doing hands-on work. If I wanted to do manual labor I would be making 20+ an hour as a masonry laborer and eventually become a mason making a nice amount of money. Instead I'm paying to do manual labor in my welding, machining, hydraulics classes. I attend my math classes, I finish all my homework and assignments on-time. I just hate the physical aspect of my program, it's not what I expected.
 

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I had a similar sort of situation to OP. I did an aircraft maintenance course in college and loved it for the first year, but once I got into the second year I didn't like it so much anymore for some of the same reasons you said. The pay sucks, the work can be ridiculous, and it's just not for everyone. I finished school with good grades, and got an awesome job doing heavy maintenance on business jets straight out of school, but it turned out I hated it. I love working on my own car, but by the time I get home from my 12-13 hour shifts of turning wrenches all day, I have no patience left to do it on my own time. "Luckily" the company shut down and laid everybody off, so I used that opportunity to look for something else and now I've changed around and gone after a different career path, and I'm liking it much better. But I LOVE airplanes...I just hated that job lol.
 

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Rather than calling it "advice," I will give you my personal experiences.

College is not a necessity. I've been working close to four years now in the role of Design Engineer, but I do not have an engineering degree. I have always been able to do my job as good as, if not better, than my co-workers, not having completed my degree does not hold me back in that regard one bit.

Not to rain on the parade, but engineers don't necessarily make good money. I am still under 50k a year. Not bad, but not good IMO. Also, be prepared to work a lot. I've been working 50-60 hours a week for my entire time as an "engineer." What makes things worse is that I'm salary, meaning that I get exactly nothing for any hours worked past 40.

Having a degree will make it MUCH easier to find a job, and your potential income will be higher. I'm speaking from experience here.
What exactly do you do as a "design engineer" without a degree? No bashing here, just curiosity.

Reason for highlighting is because I am putting the second highlighted statement in association with the first.
 

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Alot of times you can take classes at a University without actually being a registered student there, maybe you'd be able to get the prereq classes you need done so you can get an application in to the university
 

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The problem is my parents are both having issues with jobs right now as my mom keeps getting fired and my dad just got laid off.
There is an interesting bit of statistics which come into play. Unfortunately I don't have the cite handy, but it has been determined that more often than not, children follow in their parents footsteps. To break out of this, one has to really work at it.
 

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Ryan, i promise you, you aren't the only one. I was going through the same ****. I'm 19 and i recently dropped out of an Aviation Maintenance program mainly because of loss of interest, skipping class, etc. The big picture seemed great, graduating and working for Boeing or an airlines, it all seemed cool. Like you, i didn't really like the manual labor and boring lessons that were involved so my interest in school started slipping. I'm lazy as **** too. The main reason why i thought being an AMT would be a great fit was because i LOVED working and building my own car. Now i am taking regular college courses hoping to find out what i really want to do. Judging from your posts, you seem like a good kid and somewhat smart and understanding. You just need a big enough WHY. Find out WHY you are doing this and make that drive you. Life may seem long since we're young but pretty soon we'll wake up one day and we're like age 30 and be like damn... A few weeks ago i got my act together because of my "WHY". My WHY is based on a dream. My dream is to have a small house but a giant ass garage for all my project cars. I want my (future) widebody, turbo NB sitting next to my Lotus Evora S :) This "WHY" is what i think about when i don't feel like studying and eventually got me a 91 on my last chemistry exam ! Figure out your big reason and make that kick your ass. I see you got a girl which helps. Talk with her about your plans/goals and have her push you as much as you need to push yourself. Having support like that is really nice. Think about school like this: work extra hard for a few years of your life to live better for the next 50 years of your life. Also, engineering is very broad field, i am almost positive you will find something after graduation that you might actually like and get good money from ! Whether it's for a better life for you and your girl, cars, to travel the world, to help out your parents, or whatever, you gotta have that big reason to push you and make you focus on the BIG picture. I know you can do this brotha. I believe in you cuz i believe in myself. That's the first step.
 

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Alot of times you can take classes at a University without actually being a registered student there, maybe you'd be able to get the prereq classes you need done so you can get an application in to the university
I shouldn't have a problem getting into LSSU since my high school marks were pretty good and I have 70's and 80's in college right now. I'm struggling with basic college math though (I blame the teacher, since he doesn't explain ****) so I'm worried I'll do terrible in university.

There is an interesting bit of statistics which come into play. Unfortunately I don't have the cite handy, but it has been determined that more often than not, children follow in their parents footsteps. To break out of this, one has to really work at it.
My dad went to school for business and ended up being a welder all his life. I have no interest in following his footsteps. Although I wish I had his work ethic... he works his ass off like nothing I've ever seen before.

Ryan, i promise you, you aren't the only one. I was going through the same ****. I'm 19 and i recently dropped out of an Aviation Maintenance program mainly because of loss of interest, skipping class, etc. The big picture seemed great, graduating and working for Boeing or an airlines, it all seemed cool. Like you, i didn't really like the manual labor and boring lessons that were involved so my interest in school started slipping. I'm lazy as **** too. The main reason why i thought being an AMT would be a great fit was because i LOVED working and building my own car. Now i am taking regular college courses hoping to find out what i really want to do. Judging from your posts, you seem like a good kid and somewhat smart and understanding. You just need a big enough WHY. Find out WHY you are doing this and make that drive you. Life may seem long since we're young but pretty soon we'll wake up one day and we're like age 30 and be like damn... A few weeks ago i got my act together because of my "WHY". My WHY is based on a dream. My dream is to have a small house but a giant ass garage for all my project cars. I want my (future) widebody, turbo NB sitting next to my Lotus Evora S :) This "WHY" is what i think about when i don't feel like studying and eventually got me a 91 on my last chemistry exam ! Figure out your big reason and make that kick your ass. I see you got a girl which helps. Talk with her about your plans/goals and have her push you as much as you need to push yourself. Having support like that is really nice. Think about school like this: work extra hard for a few years of your life to live better for the next 50 years of your life. Also, engineering is very broad field, i am almost positive you will find something after graduation that you might actually like and get good money from ! Whether it's for a better life for you and your girl, cars, to travel the world, to help out your parents, or whatever, you gotta have that big reason to push you and make you focus on the BIG picture. I know you can do this brotha. I believe in you cuz i believe in myself. That's the first step.
I have the same goal as you aha. My goal isn't to be loaded with cash. I want a steady job that will help me have my small house (small but made with high-end materials and appliances/furniture) with a beautifully done heated garage and a nice sized back yard for my future dogs, aha. Dogs > kids. My girlfriend helps me a lot and pushes me to finish my homework or wake up in the morning. THe problem is I took 2 years off which made me forget EVERYTHING. I heavily regret this decision. The reason I want to become an engineer is the fact that there are jobs EVERYWHERE and they all pay great. With a mechanical engineering technologist diploma, I don't have much choice once I graduate and would be lucky to find a job in my hometown, whereas an engineer I'd have no problem.
 

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Too true. I didn't read all the posts but I hope OP realizes this.

For those suggesting mechanical engineering, he wouldn't be able to finish it. I'd be surprised if he got through first year. Mechanical engineering is hard work, very hard work and it doesn't align with your goals. Just because you like cars doesn't mean you should go into mechanical engineering. In fact, it has next to nothing to contribute to your hobby of cars, unless you are the type to get real geeked out calculating some intense **** about your car, which you will barely realize in performance unless you are doing some SERIOUS competing.

I don't mean to come off as a prick, I am just trying to put it bluntly. I am a 4th year mechanical engineer at arguably the best engineering school in Canada. I tell you all this through personal experience. If you are interested in mechanical engineering still, or any program for that matter, go to the campus and ask around and try to find someone in the program and just shadow them for a day or so to find out what the program really is all about. The tours that the universities / colleges give are typically a bunch of BS and don't really give you any insight into the actual program.

A word of advice though, what heyitsryan said is too true. No pain no gain. Also, don't expect money to flock in if you don't make the right moves. It's not ENTIRELY about the diploma, its about who you know and you do with those connections.
School is something that you have to work at, if you're not good at something then you need to practice and learn how to do it. Rome was not built in a day and if you're a bad student, you will not become a good student in one day either. You need to find out what type of learner you are and dedicate time to studying in a methodology that benefits you. If you're going to waste money, feel free to paypal it to me.

I lost motivation a bunch in college as well, but I ended up graduating with a 3.87 because I refused to let my grades slip, just because I was slipping. I knew it was temporary and the feelings would pass...and they definitely did. You don't need a degree to get a job, but since you've already started paying for it then you might as well finish. That's like working on a girl all night long, having her come home with you to pleasure you, and then you deciding that she isn't the right one for you right before you stick it in her. Grow a set of balls, man the **** up, and finish your schooling. I'm not sure if they're passing out vaginas in college nowadays, but I'm so tired of hearing college kids bitch about school,life, etc. Life gets hard AFTER you graduate from college, for now focus on doing well in school and having fun. I worked 10 hours a week in college and partied 3-4 days of the week. Now I'm working 50+ hours in the USAF,going to school full time for my Masters degree, and taking care of a family household ( house, cars, kids). If you want something badly enough, you will attain it through hardwork. The future will be decided by how hard you want to work, not what type of degree you are able to put on your resume ( although it does allow you to put your foot in the door).

I have two of my best friends that are engineers. They are both very intelligent people, but one took a bit longer at his schoooling, doing year long internships, and the other just finished as fast as he could and got mediocre grades. Granted, one was a mechanical engineer and the other a chemical, but the hard work that the chemical engineer put in paid off ( he graduated with a 4.0 from the University of Texas ( go longhorns!)) and landed him a well paying ( and deserved) job. The other guy is unable to find anything but entry level positions.

Good luck with everything man.
 

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I know what you're saying. I think I may get used to it after a little longer. I mean it's only been 2 months... I'm sure it takes long to get used to going from doing **** all with your life and living at home to working and school at the same while, while living on my own hours away from anyone I know (other than girlfriend whom I live with). I really want to become an engineer not only for the money that comes along with it but I find being an engineer is something to be proud of. Engineering is possibly the toughest programs to take and it would feel good to know I'm doing it. And while my high school teachers used to be upset and tell me I had more to offer and should actually try (although I'm sure they tell every student this) I feel like I've forgotten too much to just hop into university and have physics, calculus, thermodynamics, chemistry, etc. My current program is all assignments and practical/hands on stuff while I think I'd prefer having homework and taking notes.
 
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