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Supporting Member #5522
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i was told that i can use a gm 1 bar map sensor to act as a throttle position sensor. i have been doing some reading and have found that i can. i found a link on mt.net it says i will need to calibrate it, but i cant find a write up on it. im going to be running a ms1 and will be na if it matters . does any one have a write up on it? or have done this.
 

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I thought you were running carbies?

I tried using my google skills to see what I could find, I found the post you are talking about but nothing that really helped.

You would probably have to input some correction values in MS for 0% and 100% throttle based on the voltages the sensor puts out, but I don't see how a MAP sensor will work as a TPS.
 

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Supporting Member #5522
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Discussion Starter #5
I thought you were running carbies?

I tried using my google skills to see what I could find, I found the post you are talking about but nothing that really helped.

You would probably have to input some correction values in MS for 0% and 100% throttle based on the voltages the sensor puts out, but I don't see how a MAP sensor will work as a TPS.
i am running carbs but for them to run right i need a tps. i have bought several tps to fit on the carbs. but the carbs don't open as much as, so the tps will not read wot. so im going to try to use a map sensor.

me either ,the map is based off manifold pressure.
you should ask on Mt.net
i have considered it but i was hoping that there is someone running a na setup on here before i ask.

here is the closest I can find to what you are asking for. From Underdog's site

http://miata.turbomirage.com/turbo_miata_afc_install.html
thanks that does help a lot.

anyone running this na?

from the site


STEP 2: Installing and Wiring the MAP sensor

A manifold absolute pressure sensor (MAP) is connected to the intake manifold to monitor intake vacuum (and boost). It changes voltage or frequency as manifold pressure changes. Since the Miata does note have a true linear throttle position sensor for the S-AFC to use, We'll instead use a MAP sensor. There are many different MAP sensors out there, and most all can be used. For turbo cars, what you need is one that registers high enough for the boost levels you plan to run.

GM 3 Bar MAP Sensor
The GM sensor is a popular choice because it is widely available new and used. This is the sensor that I chose. The instructions below are for the GM 3 bar, but most any MAP sensor will be wired in a similar fashion.

When installing your MAP sensor, find a good location and install "above" the throttle body (high on the firewall is a good spot) and use a clean vacuum/boost source from the intake manifold to connect to the vacuum input on the MAP sensor. Run the wires carefully away from heat and moving parts.



If using the GM 3 bar, you'll need a plug for it. You can get these used off of GM vehicles, or they are available from many online performance shops. The GM MAP is wired according to the illustration above and the corresponding list below.

A: Ground
B: Sensor Signal To AFC Throttle signal wire (Gray) This wire will need to be passed through the firewall into the ECU area where the AFC harness is located. There is a little pass-through on the passenger side firewall on Miatas that is perfect for this.
C: 5V power in (Finding a good 5V signal is key. On my Miata, I tapped into a AFM wire. There are others in the engine compartment, just be sure to use a simple multimeter to test)

Picture of the sensor installed in my 1992 Miata
 

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Are you running a Megasquirt? I don't see an issue as using a normal TPS and the throttles.
You setup the TPS inside the software by setting the closed value and the fully open value and it will know everything inbetween there. Just because the TPS won't move much doesn't mean it won't work.
 
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