ClubRoadster.net banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,610 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
To preface: My car is loud. Really really loud. For real.

What i have:

2000 SE.
Factory Bose amps
Factory Bose speakers
Kenwood Excelon KDC-X996
Metra adapter harness (standard)

It works. However, the line level stuff is wonky and there's a lot of noise. Turning volume to "5" (out of like.... 40?) results in REALLY LOUD and sounds REALLY **** and REALLY DISTORTED.

I DO have the Scosche amp interface thingymabobber, but not installed yet.

Is this thing going to solve my problems? Should i somehow be using the pre-outs on my headunit instead of the speaker-level outputs?

The idea is to give this one more try spending approximately $0.00 more. If i have to spend even $20 more, i'm tearing the whole thing out forever.

Halp!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,610 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Well yeah, that's likely what will happen. But i'm not convinced that just using a Metra harness ONLY was the right plan of attack.

This won't get as loud as the MSM did, and sounds way more **** than the MSM did.

MSM was identical setup except it was hooked into the Bose amps via RCA/headunit pre-outs somehow.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,610 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
That's the thing... the MSM had this same headunit and it sounded great and didn't have all this weird distortion/feedback crap, and volume wasn't near as sensitive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,982 Posts
I have an 01 with the bose system, and I used a Scorshie harness with my Kenwood headunit. I'm not audiofile, but personally I think it sounds great. Not static or anything, and the audio is clear all the way to about 90% of the maximum value. I'd try getting the harness before giving up the project.

Can you fit a traditional headunit in the glove box?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,610 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I have the harness/amp interface already. I'll try it.

You didnt use rcas for anything?
 

·
See You Next Tuesday!
Joined
·
2,188 Posts
Should I drop my old stereo setup in the mail to you as well?

The only good thing to do with Blose is yank it all out.
Hell, even got a phatty Alpine amp from the early 90s if you truely DGAF about the weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
I'll assume this is what you have.(or something similar). Yes this will solve your volume issue. One side gets wired to your kenwood wire harness, the other side gets wired to the Mazda harness. Then shove the whole enchilada in the dashboard.

The dials can be adjusted with a small screwdriver. Typically I set them all at 1/2 way and then adjust as needed. Basically it's just like an amp "gain" and adjusting how much audio signal is passing through. What's happening is you're sending an already amplified signal to the Bose amps, which is amplifying it again, causing you to overdrive the speakers.

Using this box, or rca to speaker wire adapters with no box will get you where you need to be.
 

Attachments

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,610 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I don't even know what that is lol. Sorry man, I wish I could be more help. I just squeezed the blue wire to the other blue wire and it ended up sounding good somehow.
Heh, what it does is account for the different output levels of the headunit vs. what the Blose amps are expecting.

Should I drop my old stereo setup in the mail to you as well?

The only good thing to do with Blose is yank it all out.
Hell, even got a phatty Alpine amp from the early 90s if you truely DGAF about the weight.
Nah i'm good man, i have amps and different speakers laying around, was literally just trying to slap a spare good headunit i had laying around in here on top of the Blose stuff. I've heard it done before, it sounds good enough. This one just sounds bad, and it sounds like MoroCARR has it right.


I'll assume this is what you have.(or something similar). Yes this will solve your volume issue. One side gets wired to your kenwood wire harness, the other side gets wired to the Mazda harness. Then shove the whole enchilada in the dashboard.

The dials can be adjusted with a small screwdriver. Typically I set them all at 1/2 way and then adjust as needed. Basically it's just like an amp "gain" and adjusting how much audio signal is passing through. What's happening is you're sending an already amplified signal to the Bose amps, which is amplifying it again, causing you to overdrive the speakers.

Using this box, or rca to speaker wire adapters with no box will get you where you need to be.
So the RCA to speaker wire adapters would go from headunit pre-out (RCA side) to Blose amps (speaker wire) and use the correct level outputs and also solve my issues.

So the big question: This would also drastically increase sound quality, right? Because it would bring the output levels to something more in-line with what the Blose amps are "expecting?"

Because even when it's not loud, it sounds like crap and is noisy. Guessing that's because of a huge signal boost that's happening?

And yes, that's exactly what i have. :) Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,685 Posts
1: Remove all Bose ****.
(1a: Sell on m.net)
2: Go to walmart and get any old speaker. Any fucking POS you can find.
3: Install in doors.
4: Listen to music.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,610 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
1: Remove all Bose ****.
(1a: Sell on m.net)
2: Go to walmart and get any old speaker. Any fucking POS you can find.
3: Install in doors.
4: Listen to music.

I'm not sure you understand how loud this car is... and i've never successfully gotten any stereo louder than the Bose setup that was in the MSM without the addition of lots of amp and/or subs.

If i remove the Blose ****, nothing goes back in and i'll just use earbuds for long drives. :lol:


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
I'll assume this is what you have.(or something similar). Yes this will solve your volume issue. One side gets wired to your kenwood wire harness, the other side gets wired to the Mazda harness. Then shove the whole enchilada in the dashboard.

The dials can be adjusted with a small screwdriver. Typically I set them all at 1/2 way and then adjust as needed. Basically it's just like an amp "gain" and adjusting how much audio signal is passing through. What's happening is you're sending an already amplified signal to the Bose amps, which is amplifying it again, causing you to overdrive the speakers.

Using this box, or rca to speaker wire adapters with no box will get you where you need to be.
Scoshe makes one of these and you can get it at Walmart. This will lower the voltage of the signal you are sending to the factory amp thus making it better sounding and not so shitty basically
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
15,610 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Scoshe makes one of these and you can get it at Walmart. This will lower the voltage of the signal you are sending to the factory amp thus making it better sounding and not so shitty basically
I have one, and it is a Scosche. :lol:
 

·
Murse Magnet
Joined
·
7,743 Posts
Can confirm. Major hater is a ridiculously loud and can be heard from the other side of a mountain. That is the only way I was able to follow major hater because it is so damn fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
So the RCA to speaker wire adapters would go from headunit pre-out (RCA side) to Blose amps (speaker wire) and use the correct level outputs and also solve my issues.
Correct, one for one :)

So the big question: This would also drastically increase sound quality, right? Because it would bring the output levels to something more in-line with what the Blose amps are "expecting?"
I don't know about drastically increase, but it should improve. Close enough, two for two :)

Because even when it's not loud, it sounds like crap and is noisy. Guessing that's because of a huge signal boost that's happening?
For the most part, it's not the act of boosting a signal that makes an audio signal sound like poo. Car audio is always surrounded by all sorts of things that can introduce "interference" into an audio signal. Easiest example is alternator whine when a 4 channel amp is installed with either a poor ground or when RCAs are too close to a major power source/supply. Radios aren't immune to this, and usually have some low level "noise" in the signal, it's just that you don't really hear it just by using the stock amp that's built in. But if you amplify an already amplified signal, all of a sudden those that little "noise" that typically goes unnoticed all of a sudden you can hear. That combined with sub-par speakers only snowballs that effect.

I usually recommend customers to do the following in this order:

1. Replace the stock radio. The added power to stock speakers a lot of the time is enough to liven them up enough for the casual listener.
2. Replace the speakers. If just a radio swap isn't cutting it, this is the next logical step.**
3. Add a quality amp. Technology has come a long way where traditional 4 channel amps are't always needed. Example being the Alpine KTP-455. A small amp that gets installed just like aand behind a radio and adds 40+ watts. Easy peasy.

I put the ** because I'm going to copy and paste from a blog post I wrote that may apply here.


**Radio cheater**
Almost everyone is familiar with amp ratings like 500 watts x 1 @ 4ohms when talking subwoofers. Same applies to radios and interior speakers because guess what, your radio has an amplifier inside it :). Only there is an additional factor that people always skip over.....speaker wire resistance. Just like sub amps, radios have a sweet spot where they work the best, and that is at 4 ohms of speaker resistance.

For the rookies, a multimeter is a tool used to measure the previously mentioned 4 ohms reading. If you yank out your radio, take your handy dandy multimeter and put the probes on the speaker wire at the harness, chances are you are going to see a number greater than 4 ohms.(Probably in the 5-6 ohm range. This does not apply if you have a premium sound system like Bose, Infinity, JBL, etc.) Remember where I said radios like to work in a sweet spot? You guessed it, the higher number means your radio is working outside of it's peak performance range.

"How do I get the radio in it's peak performance range?" Simple. Math. Chances are the speakers in your car have 4 ohms printed on the back some where. Remember that reading you took behind the radio? Lets say it read 6 ohms. That means if you take the number showing on your multimeter(6 ohms) and subtract the resistance of the speaker (4 ohms) that will leave you with 2 ohms. That means the radio has to push that audio signal through 2 ohms worth of additional resistance sending the signal to the speaker. Now.....brace yourself.....if you were to install a pair of say Infinity Reference 6032si which so happen to be a 2 ohm speaker vs your traditional 4 ohm.....guess what, when you add the 2 ohms worth of resistance of the speaker wire, BOOM 4 ohms will show on your multimeter, right in the radio's sweet spot. Change speaker. Get more power from your radio. Everybody wins.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top