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The power you're making sounds right for that pulley ratio, which leads me to believe your flowing well and not reading higher boost, which may be a good thing.

My previous setup was 150/62.5 and made 16psi but only 225whp (that dyno reads low). I went to a 130 crank and noticed a big difference in boost. On the old setup, I could floor it at any rpm and instantly make 13-15 psi, then gain the extra 1-2 psi near redline. On this new pulley, it's making 5-8psi at low rpm and constantly increases as rpms increase. Not too sure what's going on or if this is normal, but I only got to drive the car for 30 min or so yesterday in traffic.
 

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Anyone figure out a clean easy way complete dual tb?
There used to be a guy selling a kit w a replacement pulley but that was a long time ago.
 

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I am pretty new around here, and still learning. I bought a 2000SE with a BRP MP62 on it, and its a blast. But the idle droop is kind of a hassle. I am getting conflicting info though on the way to solve it. Some are saying it can be negated through ECU (Megasquirt) or going to a dual TB setup. My apologies, but I've been searching like hell with no definitive answer. I'd like to be able to shift into neutral at something higher than 1000k without the car wanting to stall!
 

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Short answer: ECU or dual TB will both solve the stalling issue. Issue (or perk) of ECU is that it requires knowledge, time and/or money to configure and tune. The stock ECU has many flaws, but it works.

Long answer: I had horrible stalling issues but made it significantly better by properly adjusting the tb, but it was still bad, particularly in cold weather and during warmup. I went to a MS2 and had it properly configured and tuned by local megasquirt expert - stalling issues completely eliminated in all driving conditions. I went dual TB anyways, mainly for response and to try it out. Dual TB setup makes the system work like stock and would also completely eliminate stalling issues (if setup properly). I didn't notice much gains from going dual TB, aside from slightly better throttle response (might be in my head), but at the track, my blower seized and it was extremely convenient having the dual TB, as I stuck a filter on the stock TB and drove home without issue. For this reason alone, I would recommend dual TB for a street driven track car.
 

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Actually it wasn't limping. The few times it's happened was actually quite fun. Using all the power of the car on the street is quite fun compared to always feathering it and watching speed limits =D I was actually quite surprised with the performance & "ram-air" setup lol but I have a VVT motor so I guess it's a tad peppier.
 

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Short answer: ECU or dual TB will both solve the stalling issue. Issue (or perk) of ECU is that it requires knowledge, time and/or money to configure and tune. The stock ECU has many flaws, but it works.

Long answer: I had horrible stalling issues but made it significantly better by properly adjusting the tb, but it was still bad, particularly in cold weather and during warmup. I went to a MS2 and had it properly configured and tuned by local megasquirt expert - stalling issues completely eliminated in all driving conditions. I went dual TB anyways, mainly for response and to try it out. Dual TB setup makes the system work like stock and would also completely eliminate stalling issues (if setup properly). I didn't notice much gains from going dual TB, aside from slightly better throttle response (might be in my head), but at the track, my blower seized and it was extremely convenient having the dual TB, as I stuck a filter on the stock TB and drove home without issue. For this reason alone, I would recommend dual TB for a street driven track car.
Interesting. That kind of confirms the route I was considering. Short term goal was to go with a dual TB to solve the droop issues, and then a little longer term was to stash away some pennies to get a MS setup.

I am also considering changing out the tensioner on my setup. Previous owner rarely drove the car but wanted to basically drag strip it to the grocery store when he did (its a 2000 with 45k miles, for god's sake). Anyway, its dyno'd at 248 to the wheels and its a little cumbersome for daily driving. Thinking 205 might be a more livable power setup. If it were my second car, I wouldnt change.

Anyway, sorry to get a little OT. Was snagging some experience/knowledge while it was in front of me!
 

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What do you mean by cumbersome for daily driving? I think that might just be in the bandaid/tune/setup. There should be no drivability issues and should (read: could) drive like a factory installed V6.

You're on the right path though. A properly setup standalone will drive a hell of a lot better than the OEM on bandaids.
 

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Well, taking off in first involves incredibly fine throttle input, otherwise burnout. That's what I mean by cumbersome. I do think, however, that the throttle cable could use some lubrication. It isn't a smooth movement.
 

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Well, taking off in first involves incredibly fine throttle input, otherwise burnout. That's what I mean by cumbersome. I do think, however, that the throttle cable could use some lubrication. It isn't a smooth movement.
Same power level with 6 speed and 4.1 diff and it works fine on the street. Even when I have the car on all seasons it is still possible to drive around.
 

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I'm also around the same power level with a 6 speed and 3.9. FM happy meal and light weight flywheel. Daily driven, no issues. Never even chirp tires unless I try to, even with the old skinny tires on the rollers.

For your concern/situation, I'd say you're on the right track by starting with dual TB (then going standalone). Going dual TB will allow your right foot to modulate better with the same response as a stock TB. Is your throttle body sticking closed? Something isn't right with your setup if you need to really try to not do a burnout. Maybe you need tires lol
 

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I'm also around the same power level with a 6 speed and 3.9. FM happy meal and light weight flywheel. Daily driven, no issues. Never even chirp tires unless I try to, even with the old skinny tires on the rollers.

For your concern/situation, I'd say you're on the right track by starting with dual TB (then going standalone). Going dual TB will allow your right foot to modulate better with the same response as a stock TB. Is your throttle body sticking closed? Something isn't right with your setup if you need to really try to not do a burnout. Maybe you need tires lol
Gonna have to look into that, because the tires are solid– Eagle GSD3 with plenty of tread, 215-40/16.
 
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