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i need to replace the rear main seal and oil pan gasket.......whats the easiest way of getting the oilpan off because it looks like its going to be complicated....take in consideration i havent tried it yet......

any tips on replacing these gaskets?
 

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Rear Main Seal - Drain transmission fluid, then remove bolts that connect drive shaft to rear differential and slide the driveshaft out of the transmission. Next is the fun part, remove the power plant frame from the transmission, and most likely the differential (can't really remember). The hardest part is actually putting the PPF back in because of the contrary spacers that must go into place perfectly in order that the bolts go back in. Next unbolt the transmission from the engine to reveal the clutch and flywheel combo. You'll need to remove the clutch assembly from the flywheel. Then remove the flywheel from the engine to access the rear main seal. Replace the rear main seal. My suggestion on this is to wait and just do the oil pan gasket because at this point it would be a great idea to install a new clutch and flywheel unless you don't plan on doing one in the future. Estimated time, i would say a good saturday afternoon project. At least 5 or 6 hours.

Oil Pan Gasket - The EASIEST way is to put the car up on jackstands (4) drain the oil, and suspend the motor in its position with an engine puller (cherry-picker) disconnect the motor mounts, and lower the front k member (subframe). There are two large nuts (19mm i believe) on each side near the control arms where it connects into the frame of the car, then there are 4 bolts (14mm i believe) on the rear of the k frame (2 on each side). The bolt that is more towards the front is kind of hard to see and you will need a short extension to get to it. As the k frame is lowered, watch your brake lines so as they don't support the weight of the frame. This may sound like a lot of work BUT ITS NOT. May take you a maximum of 3 hours if you have a buddy. And the number one rule of oil pan gaskets is: DONT USE A GASKET. Buy GREY RTV silicon from your local parts store. Its usually around 5 bucks a tube. Remove the old gasket, scrape away any debris on the block or oil pan with a razor blade or the equivalent. Get a good can of carb cleaner and spray the block and oil pan down real good to get a clean surface, and it also wouldnt hurt to rough both surfaces a little with some sandpaper. Apply a fairly thin, but even layer of silicon to the surface of the oil pan and reassemble!

Hope this helps. Its been about 6 months since i've done this on a 1.8 so i'm a little rusty on numbers. But i've done it several times trying to get this 5.0 right in the miata. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
wow ok that sounds a lot more difficult then i hoped for......well i already purchased an oil pan gasket actually.......i dont have much engine knowledge history to be honest so ive never heard of NOT using a gasket and using silicone instead i truly appreciate the info u guys left tho.......


and as for the rear main seal i had my automotive instructor look under my car and he said that it was the oil pan gasket and rear main seal that was dripping a little bit of oil here n there.....but i believed it was because i was using full synthetic.....but when i switched back to petroleum it basically stopped leakin as i had suspected.....

should i just drain all the oil out and use petroleum this time around and then if it still leaks replace the seals?
 

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just pull the whole engine with tranny and replace them... lol. i think it'd b easier... i hated crawling under my car when i was doing the clutch and flywheel..
 

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Yea, that would definitely probably be the easiest way to do both. Undo a few plugs and hoses disconnect the motor from the transmission, undo the motor mounts and pull her out. I think we (2 of us) pulled my engine in less than 30 minutes. I'm just so dead set against pulling mine, because it takes about three people because of the weight and mainly the size (it's a hell of a squeeze). And I can do the stuff i said above alone. Pull the motor!!!
 

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I pulled the engine and tranny together myself in about two hours, I had the fluids drained and all the hoses and stuff disconnected beforehand though. Its really not that hard.
 

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I don't see how using synthetic and then switching to dyno oil would cause and cure the leaking problem.

Synthetic oil comes in the same viscosity that dyno oil comes in. It isn't thinner. The main advantages of synthetics are that they have additives in them that last longer than the additives in dyno oil. Because the detergents and molecules are able to keep debris in suspension longer, it's safer to go longer between oil changes. Not only that, it provides superior lubrication properties on a molecular level.

Synthetic isn't "slipperier" nor does it cause leaks. That's just an old myth. If that were the case, don't you think it would be getting past the piston rings and burning in the combustion chamber (which would not be good - most synthetics don't burn "clean" like dyno oils do), not to mention creating leaks in the numerous other places that are subjected to oiling?
 
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