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What do you feel would be a fair price to pay for trained installation and setup of a $1750 IRTB kit

  • 40% = $700

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 30% = $525

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 25% = $450

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 20% = $350

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 15% = $250

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 10% = $175

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 05% = $100

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 00% = I'd feel comfortable tackling it myself

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
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M

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Discussion Starter #1
What do you feel would be a fair price for trained, experienced installation and setup (i.e. "tuning"...note my company slogan) of a $1750 IRTB kit? Note: this would not include dyno time.
 

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Mufasa in Training
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31,064 Posts
Does that include the necessary tuning?

It'd seem to me only a few people have even installed a kit, and really anyone else's guess is rather uneducated because of it.
 

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Registered
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52 Posts
The install is easy, its the tuning that you'd want help with. Course my experiences are at altitude and apperently that fricks with the MAP on the OER SUBCON piggyback, so tuning might be alot easier at sealevel.
 

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Registered
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222 Posts
350ish seems about right. about 4 hrs worth of work at 80 dollars an hour. And to most shops its 'specialty' work.

ofcourse this price varies upon location
 

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Supporting Member
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12,259 Posts
I guess it all really depends on whose kit we're talking about. I know you've got a bundle of oem intake manifolds so you're probably familiar with what it takes to remove the original parts. If the kit is complete it should just require bolting on the new hardware, checking linkage adjustment and syncronizing them. I agree with previous posters that tuning is the tricky part and it really depends on what electronics are used and how familiar you are with them. You could spend as little as 1 hour getting them to run and idle but you could spend way more than that getting them perfect for all conditions. As an insurance policy you might want to build a leak down and compression test into the install price and give the owner a report of this data. This might help alleviate potential liability. Aftermarket engine management is for advanced users only and one small mistake when plugged in with the laptop computer could have catastrophic results. Whatever route you choose to go you should make it clear to customers what is included in the price, what to expect, and what additional items may be necessary such as maintenance that should be performed or dyno tuning. It will be slow going the first few installs but once you're familiar with the one specific kit you should be able to work faster and improve your profit margin.
 
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