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its best way to learn car control without the sacrifice of tires.

this would seem to be true but the effect of a miata on rainy ground is much closer to the physics of a 2000lbs vehicle with much more horsepower on donut-narrow tires. it in no way simulates how your car will actually lose and regain traction in a 2000lbs car with 100bhp on dry ground. when your tires regain grip on dry ground from a slide it is very rough and takes a lot of skill to maneuver. if you take all of your experience rain sliding and attempt to apply it to a real life dry road situation you're either going to flip your car or under/oversteer horribly because the vehicle didnt act like you intended.

i love to have rainy fun too! but don't take it for more than its worth. its not like drifting on dry pavement lol. at all.
 

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this would seem to be true but the effect of a miata on rainy ground is much closer to the physics of a 2000lbs vehicle with much more horsepower on donut-narrow tires. it in no way simulates how your car will actually lose and regain traction in a 2000lbs car with 100bhp on dry ground. when your tires regain grip on dry ground from a slide it is very rough and takes a lot of skill to maneuver. if you take all of your experience rain sliding and attempt to apply it to a real life dry road situation you're either going to flip your car or under/oversteer horribly because the vehicle didnt act like you intended.

i love to have rainy fun too! but don't take it for more than its worth. its not like drifting on dry pavement lol. at all.
you are absolutely right and what you said is relatively intuitive. However, counter steering to maintain a slide is much easier to first learn in the rain. The car is much more forgiving. Ive never owned a rwd car b4 so it was how i first practiced. Besides, sliding on a dry surface is retarded and expensive
 
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