ClubRoadster.net banner

1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
Murse Magnet
Joined
·
7,838 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The purpose of this thread is to give some tool reviews for working on our cars to newcomers who are not quite familiar with miatas or to more experienced veterans who wouldn't mind making their lives a tad bit easier.
 

·
Murse Magnet
Joined
·
7,838 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Blankets. They are good for laying on or even under. Every miata owner should get one.


Every miata tool kit should have the following
*Sockets both shallow and deep in size 8, 10, 12, 14, 17, and 21mm.
*Jis screwdrivers
* Floor Jack and Jack Stands (I can not emphasize how important jack stands are. Never ever get under a car without jackstands).
 

·
Murse Magnet
Joined
·
7,838 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First recommendation is for a floor jack and jack stands.

I have had a few people ask me in the past what I recommend for lifting a miata. A complaint that people have told me is that the factory lift point on the pinch weld is fine for lifting but then where do you put a jack stand to hold it.

Me personally I have the FM frame rails and I use them as both a place to put a jack stand and also as a lift point. They have worked very well so far. I currently use my trusty Harbor Freight 2 ton aluminum floor jack. It goes down pretty low, low enough that I am able to lift my car from my frame rails. My car currently rides at 12.5 center of hub to fender front and 12.75 center of hub to fender in the rear.

http://www.harborfreight.com/2-ton-aluminum-racing-floor-jack-with-rapidpump-61406.html


So to the new people that are asking what jack to recommend, I would suggest this jack or the 1.5 ton that is less expensive.

For people that do not have the frame rails, I have heard good things but no personal experience of the flyin miata jack adapter.
https://www.flyinmiata.com/fm-jack-adapter.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,685 Posts
JIS Screwdrivers.



Okay, I sell these things. Because of that, you might read this with a bit of a critical eye. I obviously want to sell more, especially to those reading this. However, I have this thing about selling products I don't like - I don't do it. I can't force myself to pretend to be enthusiastic about a poor product. These drivers are anything but poor.

I love these screwdrivers. I sold them last year and stopped because they're a lot of work to pack up and not much profit. But... I love them. I use them nearly every time I open my toolbox. Because of that, I started selling them again. Everyone who's used one and reported back has said the same thing - they're amazing.

They are as big a change from a normal screwdriver as a gear wrench is from a wrench. A set of Gearwrenches is probably my all time favorite tool (and probably what will be in the next paragraph). These Vessel JIS drivers are a close 2nd. VERY close.

Read this blog post
to learn more about them and grab a set from my store when they're in stock.


Wrenches - GearWrenches



They are literally the best tool ever. Any job on a car can have 30-60 minutes shaved off of it with these wrenches. They work great, have fine gears so they don't require a lot of swing, and come in a lot of different sizes and configs. I've got a set of straight metric (no latch), metric with the elbow joint, stubby metric, and straight SAE. I wish I had more.

Amazon has them. I think every store everywhere has them. I like the Gearwrench version over the Craftsman, Kobolt, Pittsburg, and every other version I've ever tried.

Get a set.

Jack Stands



Years ago, I collected a bunch of jack stands and reviewed all of them. The two reviews are two of the most popular posts on my blog.

Jack Stand Review part 1
Jack Stand Review part 2

Spoiler: the Esco jack stand is the finest one I've ever used. They're super strong, super sturdy, and have an enormous lifting range. I have exactly zero stress working under my car now. There's no chance of it killing me. My daughter even crawls around under there with me. I feel fine about that.



I've never felt fine about a jack stand in my life. They've always scared me. I decided to spend some money and figure out a safe stand solution. To this day, it's some of the best money I've ever spent on the car.
 

·
Murse Magnet
Joined
·
7,838 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Piggybacking off of what Adam said about the gear wrench wrenches, if you can swing it get the reversible pawl flex head ratchets. I cants stress how important that reversible pawl is. There are going to be instances where you screw something up and suddenly need to retighten what ever you were working on. With the adjustable pawl it is just the flick or the pawl, with the normal style ratcheting wrench you need to remove the wrench and flip it. This sounds fine until the situation when it isn't, then you need to cut the wrench apart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,440 Posts
I know this isn't some crazy nice super awesome amazing handy dandy tool, but one of my best discoveries working cars is:
Nitrile Gloves.

I wear them while working on the car, and magically I stay about 95% cleaner by doing so. I usually go through several pairs while working, but that's just fine by me. I have some mechanics gloves I wear as well, but these do most of the work.

Also, safety glasses. If you are under your car, wear them. Unless your car was trailered from the factory to your house and still has 0 miles on the odometer, wear these when you are under it.

I'm a cheap skate, but seriously, gloves and glasses are worth a few bucks. I replace the glasses every 6 months or so because they get scratched. So what.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,346 Posts
Yeah, you don't want the HF blue jack. You want the low-profile 2.5 ton. It costs a couple bucks more but it'll last.

Also, for nitrile gloves, don't buy the HF stuff, they're cheap and rip easily. Get these, they're also cheap and you can get a few uses out of one pair

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Nitrile-Chemical-Resistant-Powdered-Disposable/dp/B00SMP95CE[/ame]
 

·
Murse Magnet
Joined
·
7,838 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, you don't want the HF blue jack. You want the low-profile 2.5 ton. It costs a couple bucks more but it'll last.

Also, for nitrile gloves, don't buy the HF stuff, they're cheap and rip easily. Get these, they're also cheap and you can get a few uses out of one pair

http://www.amazon.com/Nitrile-Chemical-Resistant-Powdered-Disposable/dp/B00SMP95CE

I have had my aluminum blue hf jack for a few years now and it works amazingly well and is pretty light weight too (about 35 lbs maybe).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,685 Posts
On the topic of nitrile gloves, I respectfully disagree. I wear them between 1 and 4 hours every day. I've gone through a lot of brands. These are the best and are what I ship with all of my gauges.

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001EMKB8O[/ame]
That's the Kimberly-Clark KC100. They stretch nice, are thin, give GREAT tactile feel, and the color is fab. For a thin exam glove, they can't be beat.

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Halyard-Health-Nitrile-Powder-Disposable/dp/B004Z1NJJY/[/ame]
For heavier work, the KC500 is great. They're the same fit just thicker and more heavy duty. Great for wrenching, cleaning, etc.

I've gone through around 15 boxes of these gloves according to my amazon account. lol
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,346 Posts
Never tried those KC500s Adam! I'll have to give them a go next time. I should note the ones I recommended are for "heavy" work as well, although they're not so thick that you couldn't use them for activities that require dexterity. Looks like both are the same thickness so I am excited (well, as excited as one can be about gloves) to give them a try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,685 Posts
The heavy duty HF nitrile gloves are heavier than the KC500s, but they aren't as stretchy. I find they self destruct faster than the 500s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
408 Posts
These two tools have been MVP of almost any job where they are required:

Exhaust hanger removal tool
[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Lisle-38350-Exhaust-Removal-Pliers/dp/B0012S9A5U[/ame]




Remote hose clamp pliers
[ame]http://www.amazon.com/OTC-4525-Cable-Type-Flexible-Pliers/dp/B000F5JM0O/[/ame]

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,642 Posts

After a few years of wrenching and doing work related things, the above, Microflex Safegrip gloves, are the only gloves I use. They aren't exactly cheap, but they are 16 mil, have diamond grip surface on the fingers, and have an extended beaded cuff. They are thick enough that they are very hard to tear or poke a hole in, but still tactile enough to thread a screw in or start a nut on a bolt. I've used some fairly harsh chemicals as well, and it usually takes a very long while for anything to eat through them.

It's also what my local funeral home uses to move dead bodies. :whistle:

Edit: If you get the right size, they also fit the hand very nicely. I've had issues in the past with thick gloves not fitting my hand correctly, but the Microflex seem to fit like a glove.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,440 Posts
wow, I totally started the great nitrile glove debate of 2015.

I just grab them cuz i'm there and it's cheap and easy, I'm usually burning a $40 gift card someone gave me, I've never done a multi-brand study.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,017 Posts
My HF low profile jack has been putting in work since 2009.
Adam beat me to the ratchet wrenches, I've just added a set of swivel ratchet wrenches to my box.
Raven Black 6ml gloves are the best.
Diamond grips come in a close second.

Edit: Avoid the mityvac bleeder at all costs, does not work as advertised and breaks down easily. I've gone through two and will never buy one again.
 

·
CR Troll Patrol
Joined
·
2,786 Posts
This thread is going to hurt me. I should have turned back at the first sight of danger.
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top